Your email:
Your Friends email:
 
Show pictures
 
©
Relae
 
3
90.6

Relae

Refine Search > World > Europe > Denmark > Copenhagen

Location

Contact info

Jaegersbrogade 412200 Copenhagen
Denmark
T + 45 3696 6609

Affiliations

Open

MTWTFSS
Lunch              
Dinner              

Video's

Chef's personal info

Name: Christian Puglisi
Date of birth: 01-01-1982
Origin: Italy
Experience:
Rogeriet Le Petit Bofinger Taillevent Soren K Restaurant Olivia El Bulli Noma 
 

Readers Rating

   
Food
Service
Decor
Hip factor
Location
Value for money

Reviews

Where to sleep in the neighborhood?

Articles

bestemergingchef.wordpress.com
Best emerging Chefs and creators

Best emerging Chefs and creators

KimRossen/ChristianPuglisi/©P-a.Jorgensen

THE NORDIC WAVES-SCANDINAVIAN CHEFS: CHRISTIAN PUGLISI

 

The Nordic Waves is the term I used to describe this group of chefs from all of Scandinavia, mainly from Sweden, Denmark and Norway. These chefs known for 3-4 years at international level have particularly been at the forefront over the past two years due to the recognition of New Nordic Cuisine and the emphasis on a cuisine close to nature and the local products. All this, without relying on the status attained by the restaurant Noma and Chef René Redzepi. But beyond fashions and trends of the moment, I discovered a high concentration of young chefs, innovative, creative, open to the world and all dedicated to their garden!

Christian Puglisi was born in Messina (Italy) in 1982 and he is arrived in Denmark in 1989. After the Cooking school, he had internships at several major restaurants: Taillevent, El Bulli and Noma. Soon this summer (2010), he is open his first restaurant (RELAE) with his colleague at Noma, Kim Rossen.

 

RELAE is a fine-dining brasserie, a new way of thinking a gastronomic restaurant. At RELAE, it is important to have great cuisine in a cool ambiance. All the dishes are composed of 3-4 components maximum and with a focus on the freshness and the best produces as possible.

Christian Puglisi is a very talented chef and a leader from a new generation of chefs who mix influences as well as Ferran Adria that René Redzepi; minimalist, pure and research for the authenticity of flavors.

 

 

Q+A WITH CHRISTIAN PUGLISI ( http://restaurant-relae.dk/): 

1-(Scoffier) How do you explain the philosophy behind your cuisine and what is it main characteristics?

CPuglisi- The kitchen of Relæ is a simple creative kitchen. It will give a no-nonsense fine dining experience with high quality but non-luxurious products. All the dishes will be composed of 3-4 components maximum and always be going towards being fresh, healthy and based on natural flavours. The kitchen will focus on vegetables and be very seasonal and will offer a 4-course set menu and a vegetarian 4-course menu.

 

2-(Scoffier) Relae Restaurant will be your first restaurant. Can you describe the concept behind Relae?

CPuglisi- Restaurant Relæ is a gourmet restaurant in a non luxurious setting. The idea is the bring the guest as close to the kitchen as possible, get rid of what we feel unnecessary for the modern gourmet experience and give a high value for money dinner. We want to offer a “low-priced” dinner to have a faster and more dynamic ambiance in the restaurant. We want people to have fun while they are enjoying a dinner with creative ambitions.

 

3-(Scoffier) Do you have a flavour or taste from your childhood that is again memorable?

CPuglisi- Eggplant and tomatoes. The most defining raw produce of my childhood’s kitchen.

 

4-(Scoffier) Do you have a particular foods (or products) that you often use in your recipes?

CPuglisi- I really love olive oil and after years in the Nordic kitchen where it is obviously not allowed I really feel I have re-discovered it!

 

5-(Scoffier) Do you have a mentor (chefs or anybody else) that inspires you in your cuisine?

CPuglisi- That must be definetely René Redzepi and Ferran Adria. Both are courageous and willing to go their own way but very different in their approach to cooking. René use his talent and instinct and Ferran use science and intelligence.

 

6-(Scoffier) I know that you and your colleague Kim Rossen have work with René Redzepi. Do you are part of the New Nordic Cuisine manifesto? If yes, are you as strict (just local products) that Rene Redzepi in your recipes?

CPuglisi- I love the Nordic kitchen but I am not dogmatic in the way I cook. I am an Italian immigrant and not using olive oil, lemons and tomatoes would be like turning my back to my cultural heritage. The success of the Nordic kitchen comes from setting up some restrictions and appreciating what you have in your own back yard. It has created something special and I am very inspired by the lightness, freshness and acidity that Noma has put into Scandinavian cooking. But that doesn’t mean that I will follow the same geographic limitations.

 

Relae/©P-a. Jorgensen

 

7-(Scoffier) How do you develop (your inspiration) your recipes and construct your menu for Relae?

CPuglisi- I very much try and cook what I would like to eat. There is always one main element on a dish and 2-3 others to accentuate it, on contrast it or whatever the idea of the dish is. I very much try to involve all my staff, kitchen and not, into the creative process. I believe we all have some resources and I really want to use them all to the maximum. That’s why everyone is tasted and asked for an honest opinion whenever we try something new. It’s very inspiring but also hardcore, it’s impossible to make everybody happy...

 

8-(Scoffier) I know that the chef Pascal Barbot (L’Astrance) take a lot of time choosing and picking his produces at the market. Do you spend as much of time to choose and pick your produces?

CPuglisi- I would love to be Pascal Barbot and having the same access to great products as they have in Paris. In Copenhagen is a bit more difficult, there is no market in the traditional sense of the word where you as a chef can go and pick out everything. To get what we want in this country we need to talk directly to the farmer and communicate our self to high standard products. And sometimes we can go visit some of the farms to get the inspiration to move on. I think I can speak for all Danish chefs when I say that we all dream of having La Boqueria or Rungis in Copenhagen.

 

9-(Scoffier) Do you use some elements from molecular gastronomy or new technology in your cooking techniques?

CPuglisi- Yes I do. I learned a lot in my time at El Bulli and I am very happy to have some of the skills learned there as a part of my “toolbox”. I dont like to make dishes where everything is build around a technique that gives you some sort of gimmick. The techniques are helpful in improving texture and accentuate flavours but are never supposed to take over the kitchen. The quality of the produce is always more important.

 

10-(Scoffier) Can you give us a detailed recipe (Signature dish or other) that is characterized the cuisine of Christian Puglisi and the future Relae Restaurant?

CPuglisi- Recipe: Pickled Mackerel, cauliflower and lemon purée.

11-(Scoffier) What is your goal (ambitions) as chef or for your restaurant? Also, Do you think about write a book, a television show, others?

CPuglisi- I am filling out my ambitions and dreams as we speak. I have managed to open my restaurant and I am very happy so far. Now the ambitions are on the behalf of the restaurant. I want to see how much we can develop our kitchen and our guests dining experience. I would love to write a book, I don’t know about TV. I am very fond of liberty, I like doing things as I want to do them, but that might be a bit difficult with TV….

 

 

RECIPE: Pickled Mackerel, Cauliflower and Lemon Purée

 

Pickled Mackerel/©P-a. Jorgensen

 

INGREDIENTS & PROGRESSION RECIPE

Mackerel

-2 small mackerels

-350 g water

-65 g Sherry vinegar

-50 g Red wine vinegar

1. Cut the mackerel of the bone and extract all the small bones from the fillet.

2. Sprinkle salt on the fillets and leave them to cure for half an hour.

3. Heat the vinegars and water to 40C and pour over the fillets.

4. Leave them to cool for one hour and pull them out of the brine.

Lemon Purée

-6 lemons

-550 g water

-700 g sugar

1. Cut the lemons in half and squeeze out the juice.

2. Boil them for 5 minutes in plenty of water in a pressure cooker. Remove the insides.

3. Cool them down and boil them for 10 minutes with water and sugar.

4. Blend the lemons with 110 g of cooking liquid, 245 g water, 15 g sugar and 25 g of lemon juice.

5. Pass through a fine cloth and cool down.

Cauliflower purée

-1 cauliflower

-130 g cream

-Lemon juice

-Olive oil

-Salt

1. Cut the bouquet of the cauliflower and vacuum them. Boil the bag until the cauliflower is completely tender.

2. Blend the cauliflower with the liquid that is left in the bag, add the cream and season with salt.

3. Peel the fibrous parts of the remaining root and cut it in thin slices.

4. Marinate it with the lemon juice and olive oil just before serving.

To Serve

1. Add a splash of the cold cauliflower purée onto the plate and add a few spoonfuls of the lemon purée.

2. Slice the mackerel and put it on top of the lemon purée.

3. Add the raw cauliflower and serve.

 

- bestemergingchef.wordpress.com

eater.com - Gabe Ulla
Relae's Christian Puglisi on Cutting it Down to the Bone

Relae's Christian Puglisi on Cutting it Down to the Bone

christian-puglisi-eater-national-interview.jpg

[Photos: Per-Anders Jorgensen / Relae]

 

Yesterday afternoon, a handful of cooks was running about the kitchen and dining room of Copenhagen's Relae in a frenzy. Kim Rossen, the restaurant manager, sat at the bar with his laptop, reconfirming reservations and answering a constant stream of calls. At one point, another member of the staff swooshed in and yelled, "Where the fuck is my scale?!" He repeated the question a few seconds later and bemoaned the fact that he'd gone through the same trouble just a day earlier. Meanwhile, the restaurant's chef, Christian Puglisi, was somewhere in the back working on a new dish, thinking he'd scheduled this particular appointment for another day.

The second annual MAD Symposium, the congress organized by Noma chef René Redzepi, is coming up on Sunday, and close to six-hundred people are flying into Copenhagen for it. Most of them want to eat at Relae.

For the past two years, Puglisi has earned acclaim, first from colleagues and later from the local and international press, for the pure, intense, simple cooking he's been doing since leaving Redzepi's kitchen. He has stunning and occasionally polarizing ways of coaxing flavor out of the few components that make up each
of his dishes, and depending on whom you ask, the experience in his austere, casual dining room either represents an exciting and warm evolution of the bistro or will simply leave you cold. Here's the conversation Puglisi and I had after he emerged from the kitchen:

Things are a little hectic over here.
Everything is a bit too much, I must say. There are five or six hundred people flying in from all over the world for MAD.

And they want to eat here.
A lot of them, yes. It's even worse here at Manfreds, since we don't have the controlling measures we do across the street. We serve all day and do walk-ins and there's a sea of people that can come. Yesterday René texted me saying that Sean Brock and Johnny Iuzzini were there having lunch, because I didn't know.

On top of that, Manfreds [Puglisi and Rossum's wine bar across the street from Relae] is preparing the lunch for the symposium next Monday, it's our last week at Relae before shutting down for break, and I have a dinner in San Francisco I have to prepare for.

Well, let's try and talk about some things. Tell me about growing up in Italy and falling in love with food.
The fact that I was born in Italy and then came here as an immigrant was an important part of my interest in gastronomy. Even as a young child, food was really important for me. I knew nothing about food, but I was told that I came from a country with excellent eating. The way I saw it, I came from a country with huge gastronomy to another with no gastronomy whatsoever. I came from pasta and pizza to shit.

Why'd you come to Denmark?
It was my parents' choice, obviously. My father worked with citrics — buying and selling lemons and stuff like that — and it eventually got bad, like most other trades in Sicily. My mother is Norwegian, and when it came time to decide where we would go, my dad wanted New York or Australia and my mom wanted to be closer to Scandinavia. They compromised and decided to come to Denmark in 1989, which was a very good time to move here.

And the interest in cooking — how did it develop?
I would come along with my dad when he was working. Again, in classic Italian fashion, he would work as a waiter in restaurants. I'd go with him, and I started to fall in love with the atmosphere and kitchen. That brewed in me until I started cooking at the age of sixteen. Here you do cooking school for a long time, like four years. You cook and then go work in restaurants. When I was eighteen, I went to Paris by myself as part of the schooling work experience, which was very good for me. I worked at a small bistro, nothing special, but I had a lot of responsibility. Then I came back to Denmark and finished my schooling.

You went to Taillevent and other places after that?
Yes, I started off at Taillevent, where I was for only four months. Then I met a guy who had worked at elBulli and was very keen on getting me to go there. I originally wasn't very interested in that kind of cooking, but after working with this guy every day and hearing about the philosophy in the kitchen and things like that, I became very excited and tried to get a job there. I ended up getting the stage in 2006, and at the end of it, they offered me a job. I decided to go back to Copenhagen, and René contacted me for a sous chef position at Noma.

The thing that struck me when I ate here a year ago — at a time when I didn't know much about you or the restaurant — was how austere the dishes could be. It seems the goal is to take the few things that are on there and get as much as you possibly can out of them. In pieces I later read about Relae, you talk a lot about purity. Is that emphasis on coaxing out flavor your main goal here?
Yes. It takes a lot of work. It comes from having to cook within the limits that this restaurant imposed. Now, it's really more of a choice. When we opened, we couldn't cook very many meats. That was because we wanted to provide value for our customers, because we wanted to make it very interesting, and because we had a kitchen with only two or three guys and didn't want to charge too much and do the sixty covers and two seatings and all that stuff.

You have to plan out what you do very well, because you can't do fifteen different kinds of wild herbs or pick out small dill. You start cutting to the bone. You make a purée that is very powerful. You try to find the small tweaks and combinations that give you a lot. Right now, we're doing a dish that we will put on the menu tomorrow. It's a plate of warm green strawberries with a purée of watercress, chopped nasturtiums, and frozen buttermilk.

About four things and that's it.
That's it. As soon as it gets more than that, it gets more confusing, too. We've tried at least fifteen different variations of this dish already. We really deliberate.

Do you try to do that with all your dishes?
Sometimes it just comes out, but in general it really has become about making something that is really thought out. It has become a lot of work in the developing of things. Maybe most people would be fine with the second variation of the strawberry dish, but we want to put ourselves in a situation where we give people an exciting experience and are doing things we haven't done before.

Then does it bug you when people ask how you're different from Noma?
On that question, we've done pretty well. Most people don't ask it. They think it. But we knew that from the beginning. People will say, "It's going to be Noma-lite, no?" But from the start, we said no wild herbs, no foraging, none of that shit. We've been like teenagers, I often think, in that we want to do everything the opposite way from our parents. That has been very helpful to us, because it's pushed us to find our own way. We've got a long way to go as a restaurant, but I can already say that you eat a dinner with us that you don't eat anywhere else in terms of how the flavors are put together, in terms of how we run service, in terms of the particular kinds of efforts we make.

That means that some people can hate it; some people come in here and hate it. But it's very personal, and we want it that way.

Let's talk about how that paring down applies to the service style.
Much like with the food, we had to adapt to certain limitations. We realized that we needed to cut down to the bone and get rid of the unnecessary things you often find in restaurants. I believe that most people don't go to a restaurant to get serviced. For me, service is how people look at you, talk to you, engage you as human beings. It's not about how fast they pick up the crumbs on your table or even fill up your water glass. In this day and age, I think it's pretty antiquated to go out and expect for a waiter to serve you as a butler.

So, instead of having a bunch of people working in the restaurant that we have to pay for and the customer has to pay for, we reduce it to the minimum. You have the drawers where you take out your silverware, and you don't have a waiter that is on you at all time, interrupting. So now, we have the sommelier and Kim, my business partner and the restaurant manager as the guys doing service. They are the most skilled.

It's dynamic service, because these guys don't have a lot of time. So, they'll give you a brief description of the dishes, and if you want more information, they'll gladly talk as much as you want. I don't like the idea of waiters pulling off monologues, especially when the people might not understand or want to hear it. So, better to spend time with the person who really wants to know about the weird wine they are being served or something like that.

We try to meet people face to face. This is our house, and we put the playlist that we like on. We don't do that so that we can be a loud New York restaurant. It's because we are there all day, and we make it how we enjoy it. I believe you should treat people as if they're coming to your house. You receive people that way and have a good experience.

You've just entered the San Pellegrino List at #75 and you earned a Michelin star. Does the acclaim ever make you consider changing things up or introducing a few bells and whistles?
No. We got the Michelin star, and some people wondered if we would raise prices and change things to get a second. Fuck no. In a magical year that was capped by an unexpected Michelin star, why would we ever change anything? Those are indicators that we are doing the right thing. We do these things so that we can gain more liberty. Cutting things to the bone — opening a restaurant without any big investors — means that you don't have to put turbot on the menu because some fat guy wants it. You can put whatever you want on that plate.

- eater.com - Gabe Ulla

VeryGoodFood.dk - Trine
Relae in the summer

Relae in the summer

Relæ is not a common restaurant, it’s a place that challenges traditional concepts and challenges you, the diner. If you’re in Copenhagen and looking for a highly innovative and creative restaurant, which is not haut, then Relæ is the place to go!

Christian F. Puglisi, with a history from noma and elBulli and famous for his gastronomic talent, opened restaurant Relæ with Kim Rossen, also former noma, in August 2010. According to it’s website, Relæ is:

A creative kitchen free from the cultural heritage pushed upon the traditional michelin-star driven restaurant and with the possibility to keep free of being put in one of the usual boxes. Fine-dining, brasserie, bistro.

The focus is on quality, creativity and curiosity. I like that.

Before the launch of the restaurant, I followed it’s progress on Christian’s blog. He shared thoughts on the decor of the place, how to organise the kitchen, the table design, and all the challenges etc. the guys faced while working towards their target. This made me really curios. Christian’s dedication intrigued me and my expectations were therefore pretty high the first time I visited the restaurant.

I have been to Relæ three times now, and the photos in this post are from my first dinner on 2nd September 2010.

As you can see, the style of the restaurant is light and simple and highly influenced by the cool Nordic design.

Olive oil bottles

Entrance to the kitchen

Each table has a neat little drawer underneath containing a napkin and cutlery enough for the entire meal. A really cool detail, and it surprises me that I haven’t seen before.

Anyways, back to the food…

We got seated at the bar counter. There are about eight seats altogether at two different angles of the kitchen. I could observe everything that went on in the kitchen – like if I were a supervisor. Great :)

Christian Puglisi and the staff.

I went all in for food and wine. First I opted for the snack and then ordered the carnivore’s menu, but with two additional courses of the vegetarian menu. And cheese. Of course.

Fennel and baby cucumber with bagna cauda - crispy and delicious

Excellent homemade bread with olive oil to dip in

Poached celeriac, pickled seaweed, taggiasche olive

The poached celeriac, pickled seaweed, taggiasche olive dish was fine, delicate and fresh flavoured in the non-salted sense. It composed a taste-picture like nothing I had ever tried before. Very surprising, very new to me – I liked it a lot.

Pickled mackerel with cauliflower and lemon

2009 Granite Domaine l’Ecu, Muscadet Sevre et Maine, Loire

Then followed pickled mackerel which was the highlight of the evening. Again I experienced flavours in a new combination. The quality of the fish was stunning and it was so tender that it almost melted on my tongue. The lemon hidden under the mackerel twisted the dish into a new dimension.

Fried carrots, crushed blackcurrants and seaweed

2009 l’Uva Arboisiana, Domaine de La Tournelle, Arbois, Jura

The carrot dish was the most daring and challenging one. The sweet carrot blended with the salty seaweed and the intense but fruity berries. Each mouthful tasted differently in a interesting way. It was the dish I liked the least.

Breast and heart of chicken, cabbage and white currant (I believe)

NV Prety (2007) Alexandre Jouveaux, Macôn, Bourgogne

The main course of the carnivore’s menu provided a very nice Danish chicken, breast and heart with crispy skin and accompanied by cabbage and a green sauce of some kind. The chicken heart was the best I’ve ever had, delicate in taste. Delighting and fulfilling.

Various types of wild mushrooms with burnt shallots poached egg and mustard

The main course of the vegetarian menu was fantastic. I’m a sucker for mushrooms so I was in heaven and really enjoyed the intense and rich flavours all united by the runny egg yolk. Really yummy!

Tuber Aestivum Witt

Cheese with truffles

Fresh cheese of cow milk as an excuse of eating a whole lot of Umbrian truffles.

Raspberries, rape, vinegar and condensed milk

2009 Rosé d’Un Jour, La Ferme de La Sansonniere, Anjou, Loire

The dessert concluded the meal in a great way with it’s creaminess, fruit and a fine balance between sweetness and acidity.

On a general note and based on my three visits, the selection of wine for the pairings are special and challenging like the food. Needless to say the wines always matched the specialness of the food, but may not come to the liking of everybody. However, I value the courage in serving these wines and opening my eyes to what goes on in the world.

There is so much talent, will and inspiring cutting-edge gastronomy at Relæ, and I feel proud that we have a place like that in Copenhagen that challenges me and expands my horizon.

Kim & Christian, thank you!

VeryGoodFood.dk - Trine

VeryGoodFood.dk - Trine
Relæ in the Summer

Relæ in the Summer

 

 

Relæ is not a common restaurant, it’s a place that challenges traditional concepts and challenges you, the diner. If you’re in Copenhagen and looking for a highly innovative and creative restaurant, which is not haut, then Relæ is the place to go!

Christian F. Puglisi, with a history from noma and elBulli and famous for his gastronomic talent, opened restaurant Relæ with Kim Rossen, also former noma, in August 2010. According to it’s website, Relæ is:

A creative kitchen free from the cultural heritage pushed upon the traditional michelin-star driven restaurant and with the possibility to keep free of being put in one of the usual boxes. Fine-dining, brasserie, bistro.

The focus is on quality, creativity and curiosity. I like that.

Before the launch of the restaurant, I followed it’s progress on Christian’s blog. He shared thoughts on the decor of the place, how to organise the kitchen, the table design, and all the challenges etc. the guys faced while working towards their target. This made me really curios. Christian’s dedication intrigued me and my expectations were therefore pretty high the first time I visited the restaurant.

I have been to Relæ three times now, and the photos in this post are from my first dinner on 2nd September 2010.

As you can see, the style of the restaurant is light and simple and highly influenced by the cool Nordic design.

Olive oil bottles

Entrance to the kitchen

Each table has a neat little drawer underneath containing a napkin and cutlery enough for the entire meal. A really cool detail, and it surprises me that I haven’t seen before.

Anyways, back to the food…

We got seated at the bar counter. There are about eight seats altogether at two different angles of the kitchen. I could observe everything that went on in the kitchen – like if I were a supervisor. Great :)

Christian Puglisi and the staff.

I went all in for food and wine. First I opted for the snack and then ordered the carnivore’s menu, but with two additional courses of the vegetarian menu. And cheese. Of course.

Fennel and baby cucumber with bagna cauda - crispy and delicious

Excellent homemade bread with olive oil to dip in

Poached celeriac, pickled seaweed, taggiasche olive

The poached celeriac, pickled seaweed, taggiasche olive dish was fine, delicate and fresh flavoured in the non-salted sense. It composed a taste-picture like nothing I had ever tried before. Very surprising, very new to me – I liked it a lot.

Pickled mackerel with cauliflower and lemon

2009 Granite Domaine l’Ecu, Muscadet Sevre et Maine, Loire

Then followed pickled mackerel which was the highlight of the evening. Again I experienced flavours in a new combination. The quality of the fish was stunning and it was so tender that it almost melted on my tongue. The lemon hidden under the mackerel twisted the dish into a new dimension.

Fried carrots, crushed blackcurrants and seaweed

2009 l’Uva Arboisiana, Domaine de La Tournelle, Arbois, Jura

The carrot dish was the most daring and challenging one. The sweet carrot blended with the salty seaweed and the intense but fruity berries. Each mouthful tasted differently in a interesting way. It was the dish I liked the least.

Breast and heart of chicken, cabbage and white currant (I believe)

NV Prety (2007) Alexandre Jouveaux, Macôn, Bourgogne

The main course of the carnivore’s menu provided a very nice Danish chicken, breast and heart with crispy skin and accompanied by cabbage and a green sauce of some kind. The chicken heart was the best I’ve ever had, delicate in taste. Delighting and fulfilling.

Various types of wild mushrooms with burnt shallots poached egg and mustard

The main course of the vegetarian menu was fantastic. I’m a sucker for mushrooms so I was in heaven and really enjoyed the intense and rich flavours all united by the runny egg yolk. Really yummy!

Tuber Aestivum Witt

Cheese with truffles

Fresh cheese of cow milk as an excuse of eating a whole lot of Umbrian truffles.

Raspberries, rape, vinegar and condensed milk

2009 Rosé d’Un Jour, La Ferme de La Sansonniere, Anjou, Loire

The dessert concluded the meal in a great way with it’s creaminess, fruit and a fine balance between sweetness and acidity.

On a general note and based on my three visits, the selection of wine for the pairings are special and challenging like the food. Needless to say the wines always matched the specialness of the food, but may not come to the liking of everybody. However, I value the courage in serving these wines and opening my eyes to what goes on in the world.

There is so much talent, will and inspiring cutting-edge gastronomy at Relæ, and I feel proud that we have a place like that in Copenhagen that challenges me and expands my horizon.

Kim & Christian, thank you!

VeryGoodFood.dk - Trine

 

The World's Best


Popular Chefs


  1. Andoni Luis Aduriz - ES
  2. René Redzepi - DK
  3. Joan Roca - ES
  4. Syrco bakker - NL
  5. Timothy Hollingsworth - US
  6. Heston Blumenthal - GB
  7. Peter Goossens - BE
  8. Daniel Humm - US
  9. Pascal Barbot - FR
  10. Daniel Boulud - US

Popular Cities


  1. Brussel
  2. Sierre
  3. Renteria
  4. Zwolle
  5. Brugge
  6. Chuo-Ku, Kobe
  7. Albufeira
  8. Torriana, Rimini
  9. Illhaeusern
  10. Dublin

Your Country's Best